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2020 OL Draft Thread

oh absolutely - tbf i like both of them a lot - hunt is my higher rated guy but both would be great fits to come in and play RG for us - Lewis has played against the higher level of competition and i see traits from him combined with reps against high level opposition that give me confidence - with Hunt it feels a little bit more like a projection but he's definitely got all the talent you could want to move inside

Good point on quality of opposition, I would be happy with Lewis for sure. Hunt has a lower floor but a higher ceiling with versatility and no physical limitations, he reminds me of KO or Brandon Brooks.

What I dont want is for us to bring in more interior linemen with physical limitations, James Hurst was our worst example of that. He tested as both the weakest and slowest lineman of his class.
 
A little off topic but I hope all these big boys have private gyms and are staying in shape, it wouldnt take them long to blow out and lose conditioning.
 

rossihunter2

Staff Member
Moderator
Good point on quality of opposition, I would be happy with Lewis for sure. Hunt has a lower floor but a higher ceiling with versatility and no physical limitations, he reminds me of KO or Brandon Brooks.

What I dont want is for us to bring in more interior linemen with physical limitations, James Hurst was our worst example of that. He tested as both the weakest and slowest lineman of his class.

Senior bowl was really important for cushenberry and Lewis to really separate from the middle of the pack dudes and show off their class
 

rossihunter2

Staff Member
Moderator
I like Saahdiq Charles as a day 2 OL but until now hadnt really considered him moving inside... but i think he has a lot of the tools to be a potential option to slide inside to Guard for the Ravens

he's not a perfect prospect and has shown the ability to overset outside at times which makes me wonder if pass protecting in a slightly smaller space would allow him to be more effective because he has shown the ability to sustain blocks for eons in that LSU offence with a QB who likes to create

he's physical enough and seems to have adequate enough athleticism albeit there's very little pulling or screen calls on his tape where he can demonstrate it - but he doesnt seem to be limited by a lack of athleticism - just a little slow out of his stance etc.

i like him though
 

rossihunter2

Staff Member
Moderator
watching more Netane Muti for the first time since early in the process and i'm souring on him a lot the 2nd time around - his highs are really great but he's got some really glaring issues with the t-rex arms, lack of length in general and the way he so often drops his head in pass pro - he could get away with these things in college because of his crazy upper body strength but a pro DL is going to victimise those issues right now

there's lots to work with but would not feel good about him anymore anywhere until the 3rd round at least

the hope has got to be that with the inability to do medical rechecks that he can be had somewhere on day 3 and be a bargain of a boom-bust player
 

RavensMania

Staff Member
Administrator
Bob McGinn's series on OL (This is the 2nd part of a 9 part series). Part one includes WRs and TEs. I posted the TEs in the General Draft discussion thread. Didn't feel it was necessary to start a TE thread.

I broke this down into 4 posts (Tackles, Guards, Centers and the Skinny). This is based on McGinn's insider connection with scouting departments around the league.

TACKLES

1. ANDREW THOMAS, Georgia (6-5, 315, 5.17, 1): Thomas started at RT as a true freshman and at LT the past two seasons. “I thought he was the most natural and productive of all these guys,” one scout said. “He rarely gets beat. Has long arms (36 1/8 inches), and he plays with ‘em. Redirects well.” Thomas is a three-sport athlete from Lithonia, Ga. “Never have an issue with him,” another scout said. “This kid will pick up the system immediately. Cannot say enough good stuff about him. He’s a legit starter right away.” Scored 28 on the 12-minute, 50-question Wonderlic intelligence test. “Would like to see a more aggressive finish,” a third scout said. “Doesn’t move defenders with power. Considering his athleticism, he’s on the ground a little more than I expected. Will need to get stronger in his drive blocks. I have questions about his skill set.” Some scouts say his feet are more than adequate for a LT. Others disagree. “Struggles against speed,” a fourth scout said. “Some of the pass-pro deficiencies make you want to think he’s more of a right tackle. What keeps you in the boat with Andrew is that everyone at Georgia really says high things about his football makeup and character. It’s an intangible-based position. At minimum, you’ll have a really good, solid starter because he’ll do all the right things.”

2. MEKHI BECTON, Louisville (6-7 ½, 357, 5.11, 1): Started at RT as a true freshman and at LT the past two seasons. “He has the highest ceiling,” said one scout. “You shouldn’t have the initial lateral quickness at that size that this guy has. There’s some rawness there (but) he could be a perennial Pro Bowl type.” That personnel man tabbed Becton as the No. 1 lineman in the draft. So did this scout, who said, “You know what? You can’t get around him. He’s athletic enough to block DBs in space. He can bend his lower body. He has strong hands. One concern I had was he was knock-kneed. You can’t say he’s Trent Williams. He’s like Orlando Brown (6-8, 340, 5.68) of the Ravens.” Another scout compared him to former Viking LT Bryant McKinnie (6-8, 343, 5.38), the seventh pick in 2002. “But he’s tougher than McKinnie,” the scout said. “He doesn’t play hard all the time…but he takes care of business. He’s been as high as 388, as low as 350. Will fatigue a little bit. Trustworthy. A teddy bear. He’s a pretty squared-away guy.” He matured significantly as a player and learned to play through injury in 2019. “He’s not one of those overweight, lazy guys,” a third scout said. “He can move and he competes. He’s what everybody’s looking for.” He posted a Wonderlic score of 15, and his arms were 35 5/8, hands were 10 ¾. “Know why I have him fifth (on his vote)?” said a fourth scout. “Because he loves to cook and eat more than he loves frigging football…He can be a freak now. You could hit on him. You know what he is? He’s Trent Brown (6-8 ½, 353, 5.26).” Becton is from Highland Springs, Va.

3. JEDRICK WILLS, Alabama (6-4, 312, 5.06, 1): Wills, from Lexington, Ky., improved as much if not more than any player in the draft last season, according to one scout. “He’s got feet, he’s got flexibility and he competes really hard,” said another scout. “Really good with his drive block. Square pass protection. Runs and pulls with ease. Really light on his feet. Pretty good in space. His height is OK.” The third-year junior played RT only, protecting Tua Tagovailoa’s blind side. “I think he does have left-tackle feet but I don’t think he’s a left tackle,” said a third scout. “You may try to kick him to left but people don’t know how hard that is, especially when you haven’t done it.” Two-year starter. “I like Wills as a right tackle or guard because he’s tough and plays hard, but he’s not a left tackle,” another scout said. “He needed extra time there.” Scored 9 on his first attempt at the Wonderlic, which teams traditionally have regarded as the most telling score, but he scored 23 on his second try. “We interviewed him twice,” said one scout. “He wouldn’t scare you off. I would say it (the Wonderlic) is not (a big concern).” He produced the best vertical jump (34 ½) of the tackles. “I don’t get the whole excitement with him, and I’ve watched a ton of tape,” another scout said. “I don’t think he plays very athletically. He’s not a finisher. He doesn’t redirect very well. Not a strong, tough guy. He worked out well. I just don’t see the movement, finish, talent of a first-round guy.”

4. AUSTIN JACKSON, USC (6-5, 322, 5.08, 1-2): Jackson is a third-year junior with two seasons as the starter at LT. “As far as the way he looks – the frame, the long arms, the bubble, the bend – you’re, like, ‘OK, this guy’s going to be really good,’” said one scout. “But he’s a hands-outside guy, which is kind of hard to fix. With his hands going outside and bending at the waist, he had a terrible outing against (A.J.) Epenesa in the bowl game. He’s the boom-or-bust of this group. He’s either going to hit big and be a starter for a long time, or he’ll bust out and people will say, ‘He wasn’t any different than I thought.’ Very, very inconsistent.’” In July, he became a bone marrow donor for his sister Autumn. “He basically saved her life,” another scout said. “They corkscrewed into his hip, twice on the left and once on the right, to get the marrow out. When he recovered his hip flexibility was not what it used to be. He lost like 25 pounds. If you look at the early tape you go, ‘What the hell? This guy is thinking about coming out?’ He was getting beat on the edges because he couldn’t move laterally. It wasn’t until the seventh or eighth game where he was starting to feel normal. His best football is ahead of him. Awesome kid.” He posted a 25 on the Wonderlic and his broad jump of 9-7 led tackles. “He makes run and pass look easy,” another scout said. “Guy doesn’t work up a sweat. Has the feet to play left tackle. Needs a little work.” Added another executive: “One thing to think about, he missed all last offseason and now he’s going to miss this whole offseason. So the idea he’s got to get stronger … well, when? Next year?” Jackson is from Phoenix. His grandfather, Mel, started at RG for Green Bay in 1977-’78.

5. ISAIAH WILSON, Georgia (6-6 ½, 350, 5.37, 1-2): Wilson is a third-year sophomore with 24 starts at RT. “He’s just gigantic,” said one scout. “Size is his best friend. He is so big. Not top-flight foot movement but good enough for being that big. He’s strong and he’s tough. I doubt that (first round). That would shock me.” He played opposite Thomas, giving the Bulldogs possibly the nation’s heaviest line. “Like him,” another scout said. “He’s massive. He moves good. He’s got great length. I think he’s a starting right tackle and will play for a while.” Arms were 35 ½, hands were 10 ¼. “He is one tough, nasty guy,” said a third scout. “I guess you could play him on the left side and get by with him.” He posted a 28 on the Wonderlic. “He wasn’t ready to come out,” said a fourth scout. “He needed another year. He’s really susceptible to a good bull rush. For being such a big human being there’s some functional lightness to that guy. He looks like a big mountain of a man but he doesn’t play real heavy. You can take him down the middle.” Wilson is from Brooklyn, N.Y. Added a fifth scout: “He is big but he’s so bad technique. He ducks his head, he bends at the waist. But that (guy) is big. He could be a star or bust.”

6. EZRA CLEVELAND, Boise State (6-6, 311, 4.97, 1-2): Cleveland is a three-year starter at LT. “He’s a really good athlete,” said one scout. “He’ll be a solid pass protector. I think he’s steady. He tested out really well. He’ll be close to the first (round). Tackles go.” Lightly recruited out of Spanaway, Wash. “He reminds me of some of the guys Green Bay has had over the years,” said a second scout. “(Bryan) Bulaga, (David) Bakhtiari, guys that kind of are just functional and get the job done. They’re not spectacular, just steady … if Cleveland didn’t have to interview people would really like him. But his interview was so low energy and just kind of flat line that it kind of just scared people. He’s so Steady Eddie. It’s not that he’s a bad guy at all. Cleveland … he’s Boise, he’s a junior, he’s got to get stronger. But he is athletic.” He played most of 2019 with turf toe injury. Led tackles in five categories: the 40, Wonderlic (30), bench press (30), short shuttle (4.46) and 3-cone (7.26). Arms were just 33 3/8, hands were a tiny 9. “Everybody’s high on him,” said another scout. “Why am I not that high on him? There’s a degree of tightness in his hips. Has balance issues. I question his lower-body strength. Not going to beat point-of-attack defenders. Finesse guy that uses his size. Size defenders knock him around. I question his lateral adjust. But guys like him.


7. JOSH JONES, Houston (6-5, 319, 5.28, 2): Spent five years with the Cougars, starting at LT from 2016-’19. “He almost left Houston as a grad transfer,” one scout said. “He was fed up with all the coaching changes and no continuity or stability. He stayed one more year and it paid off for him. He’s a basketball-background guy. This was his real year of production and got on the radar of people. He’s athletic. Sort of technique-flawed. It’ll take him a little time to get it all buttoned up. He’s a serviceable, functional NFL tackle. You can get by with him, I think.” He posted a Wonderlic score of 14 and his arms were 33 7/8, hands were 10 1/8. “Understands how to use his hands in pass pro,” said a second scout. “Struggles to move guys at the point of attack. Inconsistent.” Didn’t start playing football until his sophomore year of high school in Richmond, Texas. “He’s not a kid you want to sign off on completely,” a third scout said. “He definitely showed flashes of talent. He’s a little bit inconsistent. Pass pro’s his thing. His run blocking is a little iffy.”

8. MATT PEART, Connecticut (6-6 ½, 318, 4.10, 2-3): He should be a starter in his second season, according to one scout. “He really surprised me,” said one scout. “I haven’t watched them (Connecticut) in years. They may be the worst program in the country. But he has great feet. He’s a natural left tackle. No punch as a run blocker. Better tenacity than strength. Heck of a pass blocker.” Born in Jamaica, Peart emigrated to the U.S. in 2002. “There’s good and bad with him,” a second scout said. “Probably the longest guy (36 5/8 arms) in the draft. He’s got a big basketball player’s build. But he doesn’t have any strength. He’s not a throwaway. If somebody gets him in a good strength program … He’s got interests outside of football, which isn’t typical for an offensive lineman. He’s not a bad kid; you just want to make sure he’s committed. He has developmental starter ability.” He started at RT in 2016-’17 and at LT in 2018-’19. Name me an offensive lineman for UConn in the last 25 years,” said a third scout. “Just name one.” Peart posted a Wonderlic of 20.

9. PRINCE TEGA WANOGHO, Auburn (6-5, 305, no 40, 2-3): Their calling card is the ability to negate the up-field rush, according to one scout, but struggles mightily against counter moves inside. “He’ll be a second-round pick,” another scout said. “He’s close to the first. He’s real quick. He’s got short arms (33 ½), which is concerning. Good agility, good movement, good effort.”He came to the U.S. from Nigeria in August 2014 to play basketball in Montgomery, Ala. “He doesn’t know that much about football,” said another scout. “He’s going to (need) some reps. He’s not ready to play right now. He’s not going to be an instant asset to you, but he will become a starter. I’d take a chance on him in the second round.” Teams expressed concern about an injury history that includes a tibia-fibula fracture in 2015 and arthroscopic knee surgery in January. Spent five years at Auburn, starting 32 games at LT. “Doesn’t play with urgency,” said another scout. “Constantly late out of his stance. Has issues at the second level. He’s got a little work to do.”

10. LUCAS NIANG, TCU (6-6, 315, no 40, 4): Niang made 27 starts at RT over the past three seasons. “He’s a big, talented guy, but he’s inconsistent,” one scout said. “You would like a guy as big as him to be a little more dominant. I don’t want to go so far as to say he’s not tough, but he’s not as tough as he should be for as big as he is. That plays into who the kid is. He comes from money. He doesn’t have to have football. Some of these guys are living for it. I don’t know if that’s the case with him. He does have starter talent.” Regarded as a distinct medical concern for several teams because of a labrum tear in his hip that required surgery in October. “He’s a strong, very physical right tackle,” another scout said. “He’s an adequate pass blocker but doesn’t have the feet to play left tackle. He’s the type of guy that plays.” From New Canaan, Conn, he’s lived in Switzerland and is fluent in French.

OTHERS, in order: Saahdiq Charles, LSU; Jack Driscoll, Auburn; Yasir Durant, Missouri; Charlie Heck, North Carolina; Alex Taylor, South Carolina State; Colton McKivitz, West Virginia; Trey Adams, Washington; Tyre Phillips, Mississippi State; Terence Steele, Texas Tech; Blake Brandel, Oregon State; Anthony McKinney, TCU; Drew Richmond, USC.
 
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RavensMania

Staff Member
Administrator
GUARDS

1. TRISTAN WIRFS, Iowa (6-5, 320, 4.87, 1): Wirfs is a third-year junior from Mount Vernon, Iowa (pop. 4,000). “All-state wrestler,” said one scout. “May be a better guard. Strong, physical run blocker. Has enough size and strength not to get bull-rushed. Strong hips. You may start him at right tackle, but eventually you’ll move him inside to guard.” Made 29 starts at RT, four at LT. “After he tested at the combine people started saying, ‘He can play left tackle,’” said another scout. “There’s no verifiable evidence of that. He was not good at left tackle for Iowa.” He blew out the combine with guard-bests in the 40, vertical jump (36 ½) and broad jump (10-1). “You can play him anywhere you want,” a third scout said. “He’s really good. He had great numbers at the combine but other than blocking the inside power move all he needs is technique. He’ll be a star.” He posted a Wonderlic of 23. “He’s a better athlete than football player at this point,” said a fourth scout. “He isn’t your typical polished Iowa NFL-ready guy from a technique and awareness standpoint. He’s not ready to play. Where you draft him you’re going to have to plug him in and start him, and he’s going to lose you some games next year. But he’s obviously a phenomenal test athlete so some team will get enamored with that. The tape is really up and down.”

2. ROBERT HUNT, Louisiana (6-5, 323, no 40, 2): Started at LG in 2016-’17 and at RT in 2018-’19. “Tough guy,” said one scout. “Got some initial pop. He can strike you. Not an elite athlete. Got some waist-bend issues. But there’s a lot to work with.” His chances for an early selection took a hit because of a groin injury that required surgery in January and cost him the last seven games and post-season participation. “Had he been able to go to the Senior Bowl and showed out against tough competition he might be a guy we’re talking about late in the first round,” another scout said. “He plays with a mean streak. He’s powerful. He can move people.” His Wonderlic score of 13 was second-lowest among the top guards. “He’s actually much more football smart than you want to give him credit for,” said a third scout. “He’s going to go pretty high because he can play four positions. He’s a little bit rough around the edges. You don’t want to rush him. You don’t want to depend on him to do too much. Maybe third round, but tackles usually get overdrafted so second wouldn’t surprise me.” From Burkeville, Texas.

3. SHANE LeMIEUX, Oregon (6-4, 308, 5.12, 3): Started all 52 games at LG from 2016-’19. “That is a tough, competitive [profanity deleted],” one scout said. “It surprised me. I wouldn’t think coming out of the Oregon offense there would be a guy like this from what they do. But this guy’s mean. He’s limited athletically a little bit. He’s got straight-line speed but some stiffness. Once you get him out in space he struggles a little bit. He’s more of a power-game player.” Short arms (32 ¼), relatively smaller hands (9 ½). Two scouts said he reminded them of Richie Incognito. “Just style of play, nasty, strong hands, sturdy in pass pro — not all the other stuff (with Incognito),” said one. “Not the most agile in space. Grit, finishing to the whistle, that’s him. Realistically, he’ll probably go third, fourth round. Wherever he goes, I think he’s a starter.” He’s from Yakima, Wash. “Sort of a meat-and-potatoes guard,” said a third scout. “Probably a one-spot guy. You can’t move him all over the place. He’s solid. He’ll be an NFL starter.”

4. JONAH JACKSON, Ohio State (6-3 ½, 306, 5.26, 3): Jackson started for 1 ½ seasons before graduating from Rutgers and playing a final season at the other end of the Big Ten standings as a grad transfer. “You walked on the field at Ohio State and looked at the offensive linemen and you could pick out the guy from Rutgers right away,” said one scout. “He’s got a horrible body. He’s a little bit behind having been at Rutgers. The beginning-of-the-year film wasn’t as good in a new scheme. But then, by the end of the year, he was playing well, and he did well at the Senior Bowl. He doesn’t do everything pretty, but he’s a good football player. He’s a great, great guy, and he’s got some mean to him.” Started 16 games for the Scarlet Knights, mostly at RG but also three times at center, before moving to LG in Columbus. “I hate Rutgers players, but that Jackson kid, he’ll play 10 years,” said another scout. “He’s a tough (guy) and he’s smart.” From Media, Pa.

5. BEN BARTCH, St. John’s (Minn.) (6-5 ½, 309, 5.16, 3): Reminiscent of Ali Marpet, an NCAA Division III guard from Hobart (N.Y.) who was the Buccaneers’ second-round pick in 2015. Marpet is a five-year interior starter for Tampa Bay. “He’s the best small-school guy since Ali Marpet,” said one personnel man. “This Bartch kid may surprise everybody. They go down to the Senior Bowl and they either wilt or they fit in. He fit in.” Bartch made four receptions in two seasons as a backup TE for the Johnnies, located in Collegeville, Minn., before adding weight and making the move to LT in 2018. He also played tackle in Mobile but some teams say his arm length (32 7/8) is better suited inside. “He liked the weight room,” said another scout. “He put on a ton of weight (he was 280 last spring). It’s a small-college weight room, and he had to eat on his own and all that stuff. I think he did the most that he possibly could with his development. He’s an intriguing guy, for sure. He has the temperament that you want.” Bartch is from McMinnville. Ore.

6. DAMIEN LEWIS, LSU (6-2, 327, 5.24, 3-4): Lewis played two seasons of junior-college ball before starting all 28 games at RG from 2018-’19 for LSU. “Like him,” said one scout. “He is f—— powerful. He’s short, but he’s compact. The key with him is, will he be able to play center? He’s a really good Day 3 guy. He’s too short but he’ll end up playing for somebody.” His ability to play center might hinge on his ability to make the line calls. His Wonderlic score of 11 was low among the top guards. “Wasn’t crazy about him,” said another scout. “Typical big, slow guy. Competes. Wasn’t much there.” Lewis is from Canton, Miss.

7. JOHN SIMPSON, Clemson (6-4, 320, 5.26, 4): Simpson backed up for two years before starting all 29 games at LG in 2018-’19. “There are some flashes of him controlling or pressing out defensive linemen but also inconsistencies,” said one scout. “Lacks true explosive power off the ball and shock on contact.” Weighed 336 a year ago. “He’s tough but he has no feet,” said a second scout. “Clemson’s offensive line, with the exception of the (sophomore) left tackle, was not good.” Had the most bench-press reps (34), the longest arms (34 1/8) and the biggest hands (11 ¼) among the top guards. “He did just enough to keep you interested,” said a third scout. “Problem is, he’s a guard only. That reduces his value.” From Charleston, S.C.

8. HAKEEM ADENIJI, Kansas (6-4 ½, 301, 5.18, 4): Four-year starter at LT. “I like that guy,” one scout said. “He’s developed a lot over the last two years and has more to go. Maybe the volatility of that program has held him back a little bit. He had four different offensive line coaches during his time there. Smart kid, good kid, good athlete, has the right size, has the right feet, has the right length (33 ¾ arms). I think he’ll start out at guard, but ultimately I think he’d be better as a tackle because he’s more long and athletic than strong and stout.” His Wonderlic score of 34 led the top-10 guards and he had a strong week at the Senior Bowl. “I don’t like him,” said another scout. “Small-boned athlete. Not a very strong player. Hips get high in pass protection. Wish I saw better control of his body. Doesn’t always finish. … He just kind of creeps around and gets in the way. He’d be an oozer, too.” From Garland, Texas.

9. KEVIN DOTSON, Louisiana (6-4, 313, no 40, 4-5): Dotson wasn’t invited to the combine. “He’s very intriguing,” said one scout. “He’s going to be one of the first non-combine guys taken. He’s physical. He doesn’t give up any pressure. One of the more productive players in that conference (Sun Belt).” He started 52 of 53 games at RG. Dotson, who’s from East Iberville, La., is the son of a high school coach. His two uncles, DT Alvin McKinley and FB Dennis McKinley, were drafted in the middle rounds and had substantial NFL careers. Short arms (32 ½) but big hands (10 5/8). “He’s got stiff ankles,” another scout said. “Non-athletic power guard. Phone-booth kind of player. He might be a late pick.”

10. LOGAN STENBERG, Kentucky (6-6, 317, 5.34, 4-5): Stenberg was a three-year starter at LG. “Remember Joe Jacoby and Conrad Dobler, guys like that?” one scout said. “He’s an old-time player. They just want to get in the dirt. I’m sure if he doesn’t get 60 pins a game he’s had a bad game. Tough, nasty, mauler type. Questionable lateral quickness and change of direction. I don’t like this guy as an athlete, but I like him as a player. These guys line up and play.” He has short arms (32 ½) and was heavily penalized, but he’s durable. Another scout calls Stenberg, from Madison, Ala, a “country boy … he has a pickup truck, chews tobacco. Mother’s a teacher, father’s retired Army lieutenant colonel. Has a farm now and raises cattle. Smart kid.”

OTHERS, in order: Ben Bredeson, Michigan; Netane Muti, Fresno State; Tremayne Anchrum, Clemson; Michael Onwenu, Michigan; Cameron Clark, Charlotte; Jon Runyan, Michigan; John Molchon, Boise State; Solomon Kindley, Georgia; Kyle Murphy, Rhode Island; Cordel Iwuagwu, TCU; Simon Stepaniak, Indiana.
 

RavensMania

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CENTERS

1. CESAR RUIZ, Michigan (6-2 ½, 307, 5.11, 1-2): Ruiz started five games at RG as a true freshman and then all 26 at center the past two seasons before declaring a year early. “I think he’s going to be a Pro Bowl center,” said one scout. He had a long afternoon against Alabama’s Raekwon Davis in the Citrus Bowl, according to one scout. “He’s like a (Garrett) Bradbury,” the scout said. “He’s really going to be excellent for a zone team because he’s so quick. Really got to the second level. Only negative I had was the strength thing. He just had OK strength. He’ll have problems like Bradbury has problems, but he can do all the stuff that Bradbury did.” Led the centers in vertical jump (33), broad jump (9-5), bench press (28) and hand size (11). His arms were 33 1/8. “He’s the top center,” said a third scout. “Right at prototype from the size and the length. He’s got good feet and movement skills. Smart, strong, good hands.” He posted a Wonderlic score of 21. “We have some division on him,” said a fourth scout. “I think he will be a starter. I don’t know if he’ll be a win-with starter. I don’t think he’s a great athlete. He is strong, really strong naturally. He didn’t measure as big as we thought he’d be. He’s better than Mason Cole as a center. He wasn’t a guy that excited me, but there’s only 32 centers.” Ruiz is from Camden, N.J.

2. LLOYD CUSHENBERRY, LSU (6-3, 312, 5.28, 2-3): Cushenberry, from Carvilla, La., is a fourth-year junior and a two-year starter. “He’ll be a Pro Bowl center,” said one scout. “His wingspan (84 ¼ inches) is the longest I’ve ever seen on a center. Phenomenal kid. Held his own against (Javon) Kinlaw in the one-on-one’s (at the Senior Bowl). He’s about the only one that did that. … Elgton Jenkins played great for the Packers (in 2019), but Cushenberry is a better prospect than Jenkins.” Made himself some money in Mobile. “I thought he was kind of a heavy-footed player,” another scout said. “At the Senior Bowl, he showed he had feet like a dancing bear. Now I think he’s going in the second. He’s got an anchor ass to him. Plays like a good athlete.” Longest arms (34 1/8) among centers, hands were 10 3/8. “He’s not displacing anybody (in the run game),” said another scout. “Can become a good depth player.” He posted a Wonderlic of 15. “He can anchor and has length,” a fourth scout said. “He does some nice things, but he gets beat too much when isolated.”

3. MATT HENNESSY, Temple (6-4, 307, 5.18, 3-4): Hennessy is a fourth-year junior and three-year starter. “He’s a really good technician,” said one scout. “Really light on his feet. He can bend. He’s tough. High intangibles. Not powerful, but not deficient.” Hennessy is from Bardonia, N.Y. and “people love him,” another scout said. “He worked out really well. Little bit physically overmatched but plays hard, gets after it, tough guy.” His Wonderlic of 34 was tops among centers. Arms were merely 32 ¼. “I thought he was fifth, sixth round,” a third scout said. “He’s not very big. He got tossed around. Their blocking scheme at Temple is everybody goes left or everybody goes right. Pass block, run block. You’re just sealing a gap. It’s not like taking somebody head-on all then time. I didn’t see him play to any of his numbers. He’s a good football player, but I think he’s a backup.”

4. DANNY PINTER, Ball State (6-4, 306, 4.88, 4-5): Pinter played TE in 2016-’17 (nine receptions) before moving to RT in the 2018 off-season. “He’s got 31 7/8 arms,” said one scout. “That’s why I made him a center. He’s going to make a hell of a center.” Center is purely a projection. “He worked out well,” said a second scout. “He’s a good athlete. But you’re talking about a guy from Ball State that you’re going to fall in love with as a center and you’ve never seen him play center?” He posted a Wonderlic of 27. “He can play center, which he’s been working at,” a third scout said. “Got all the intangibles for center. He’s athletic, super tough, really a competitive guy. Goes for the finish. Will take some work to develop him where he can play guard, too. He’s never done it. Awesome kid.” From South Bend, Ind.

5. NICK HARRIS, Washington (6-1, 302, 5.13, 5-6): Harris made 17 starts at guard in 2016-’17 before starting 25 games at center in 2018-’19. “He looks awful on the hoof,” one scout said. “He’s just a pear-shaped, bad-body guy. But you put the tape on and he’s a damn good player.” Harris is durable and smart (Wonderlic of 30). His arms were 32 1/8. “He’s fine, he’s a good athlete,” another scout said. “But I hope we play him.” Harris is from Inglewood, Calif. “I love him, but he’s small,” said a third scout. “He super smart, gets to the second level, all that. But it seems like every time he measured in somewhere he lost an inch. I think he’ll play because of who he is. I thought he’d be a second- or third-round pic but with those measurables it’ll scare teams off.”

OTHERS, in order: Keith Ismael, San Diego State; Tyler Biadasz, Wisconsin; Darryl Williams, Mississippi State; Trystan Colon-Castillo, Missouri; Cohl Cabral, Arizona State; Justin Herron, Wake Forest; Jake Hanson, Oregon.
 

RavensMania

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THE SKINNY
UNSUNG HERO

Trey Adams, T, Washington: The course of his career was altered in October 2017 when he suffered a torn ACL in a non-contact injury. Then he needed season-ending lumbar disc surgery two games into 2018. Adams (6-8, 318) returned to start at LT in ’19 but wasn’t effective and then ran 5.60 at the combine. “He was a sure-fire No. 1 pick in ’17,” said one scout. “After that he was a shadow of himself. Even when he walks now he looks like he’s still limping.”

SCOUTS’ NIGHTMARE

Saahdiq Charles, T, LSU: This is a first-round talent. Charles (6-4, 321, 4.98), a three-year starter at LG, has terrific feet, flexibility and body control. “Nobody ever beats this guy,” said one scout. “…But guys might get scared away from this dude.” Multiple failed drugs for marijuana led to a six-game suspension last season.

SCOUT TO REMEMBER
Joe Woolley: A long, tall Arkansan, he was a successful prep coach in Texas and then a scouting/personnel director for the Oilers, Saints, Eagles and Cardinals for about 20 years. One of Bum Phillips’ favorite people, Woolley worked under him in Houston and New Orleans before going to Philly and Phoenix with Buddy Ryan. In New Orleans, he was responsible for establishing an extensive film library that became a model for the NFL. Never one for a loss for words, Woolley loved to wisecrack at draft time. When asked about Wayne Simmons, the combustible linebacker from Clemson, not long before the 1993 draft, Woolley drawled, “Keep him sober and not beating up bartenders and he’ll be all right. He’s got a little shaky character in him but I’ll tell you what. I’d rather have them f—— that will fight than those that won’t.” Awaiting a heart transplant that never came, he died in 2003 at age 65.

QUOTE TO NOTE
NFL executive in personnel: “Here’s the problem. Those guys at (Louisiana) Lafayette and Temple and Houston and Florida Atlantic, they have never seen an NFL defensive lineman. They never have gone against one in those leagues. They don’t know what one looks like. It’s called level of competition. That’s why I watch SEC film. Even Big Ten guys play against better competition than they do.”
 
I kinda like the idea of moving Damien Lewis to center, his height wouldnt matter and he could uproot anyone in front of him.

I've been high on Hunt for versatility and upside and Lemieux but I think I overlooked Lucas Niang, he could play guard or RT. All day 2 and 3 players.

Lucad Niang #77

 

cdp

Ravens Ring of Honor
THE SKINNY
UNSUNG HERO

Trey Adams, T, Washington: The course of his career was altered in October 2017 when he suffered a torn ACL in a non-contact injury. Then he needed season-ending lumbar disc surgery two games into 2018. Adams (6-8, 318) returned to start at LT in ’19 but wasn’t effective and then ran 5.60 at the combine. “He was a sure-fire No. 1 pick in ’17,” said one scout. “After that he was a shadow of himself. Even when he walks now he looks like he’s still limping.”

SCOUTS’ NIGHTMARE

Saahdiq Charles, T, LSU: This is a first-round talent. Charles (6-4, 321, 4.98), a three-year starter at LG, has terrific feet, flexibility and body control. “Nobody ever beats this guy,” said one scout. “…But guys might get scared away from this dude.” Multiple failed drugs for marijuana led to a six-game suspension last season.

SCOUT TO REMEMBER
Joe Woolley: A long, tall Arkansan, he was a successful prep coach in Texas and then a scouting/personnel director for the Oilers, Saints, Eagles and Cardinals for about 20 years. One of Bum Phillips’ favorite people, Woolley worked under him in Houston and New Orleans before going to Philly and Phoenix with Buddy Ryan. In New Orleans, he was responsible for establishing an extensive film library that became a model for the NFL. Never one for a loss for words, Woolley loved to wisecrack at draft time. When asked about Wayne Simmons, the combustible linebacker from Clemson, not long before the 1993 draft, Woolley drawled, “Keep him sober and not beating up bartenders and he’ll be all right. He’s got a little shaky character in him but I’ll tell you what. I’d rather have them f—— that will fight than those that won’t.” Awaiting a heart transplant that never came, he died in 2003 at age 65.

QUOTE TO NOTE
NFL executive in personnel: “Here’s the problem. Those guys at (Louisiana) Lafayette and Temple and Houston and Florida Atlantic, they have never seen an NFL defensive lineman. They never have gone against one in those leagues. They don’t know what one looks like. It’s called level of competition. That’s why I watch SEC film. Even Big Ten guys play against better competition than they do.”
This article has exaggerated quotes but they're still concerning.

“The bar is so low for centers and guards in the NFL,” said one executive. “People are just so desperate for bodies.


“The way the game is played in college, you’re in a two-point stance. It’s all hurry-up, no-huddle. If you can just engage your opponent, it’s a win. The line play is so bad. They want to run 99 plays and wear the defense down. If they can get three guys to stay upright in the middle, that’s good enough.”
 

rossihunter2

Staff Member
Moderator
I kinda like the idea of moving Damien Lewis to center, his height wouldnt matter and he could uproot anyone in front of him.

I've been high on Hunt for versatility and upside and Lemieux but I think I overlooked Lucas Niang, he could play guard or RT. All day 2 and 3 players.

Lucad Niang #77



interesting that i was literally just doing some Niang re-evaluation - come here and literally there you are and here he is - literally just watched this tape lol

he's someone that i just kind of forgot about for a while so as i adjusted my board he would just keep slowly creeping down the board

dude's easily a 2nd round type talent at tackle - i would say he has "surprising" footwork - he's a bit too dancy but it's impressive how well he moves - especially when you learn about the hip issue he had

definitely someone i could see transitioning inside to guard if he gets drafted by a team with 2 set tackles... but honestly he probably gets taken as a tackle earlier than anyone who doesnt need a tackle will want to
 

rossihunter2

Staff Member
Moderator
In general this OT class is insane - i had 11 WRs in my top 50 but I think I'm going to be ending up with 9 (10 in the top 60) and that doesnt even include Ezra Cleveland who I think if I was a primarily zone team id be pretty interested in him in the top 50/60 - and he may well get drafted in the 2nd round too

also doesnt include Matt Peart who some think of as being a 2nd round type talent too

insane class of OTs, great class of WRs, incredibly deep class of CBs

the guard class is not top heavy but has some depth to it, the C class to me is basically just 4 guys of any note in the first 2 days, TE class is basically absent but a mess of day 3 guys, S is sparse but has some strength to it, EDGE is short of a lot of talent at all levels of the draft, DL is incredibly top heavy, QB has some depth to it through the class but not deep at the top, RB has some talent all through the draft but doesnt standout vs previous years, LB is really strong

great draft class if you're looking for OTs, WRs, CBs, LBs, RBs
 

rossihunter2

Staff Member
Moderator
I kinda like the idea of moving Damien Lewis to center, his height wouldnt matter and he could uproot anyone in front of him.

I've been high on Hunt for versatility and upside and Lemieux but I think I overlooked Lucas Niang, he could play guard or RT. All day 2 and 3 players.

Lucad Niang #77



hadn't considered Lewis at OG

my top 3 guards are all listed in your post though

Hunt at 1
Lewis at 2
Lemieux at 3

for what it's worth ive then got Bredeson at 4, Simpson at 5, Dotson at 6, Jonah Jackson at 7
 
@RavensMania



this tweet thread from the article you posted shows up how some scouts think lol - i think its really interesting how hung up some guys get on things that really arent that relevant

no one thought myles garrett liking and spending a lot of time on poetry was a problem lol


I think its important if we want to avoid drafting guys like John Urschel who are more interested in other things
 
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